The 2017 SEC Government-Business Forum On Small Business Capital Formation

On November 30, 2017, the SEC held its annual Government-Business Forum on Small Business Capital Formation (the “Forum”). It will be several months until the final report with recommendations from the forum is published, but the opening remarks from SEC Chair Jay Clayton and Commissioners Kara Stein and Michael Piwowar provide ongoing and consistent guidance as to the current focus of the SEC. For a review of the recommendations by last year’s forum.

As expected, the topics of cryptocurrency and ICO’s were front and center at the Forum. In his opening remarks at the Forum, Division of Corporation Finance Director William Hinman confirmed that the SEC believes that ICO’s generally involve securities offerings and that the securities laws must be complied with. Hinman continued that the SEC is providing guidance through enforcement and public statements on the topic.

As with other statements and speeches, the SEC hedges by pointing out the validity of an ICO as a capital raising tool, and of course, the innovation potential of blockchain. The SEC is not trying to discourage ICO’s or blockchain innovation; they are trying to discourage ICO’s that fail to comply with securities laws, and the unfortunate, multiple frauds being perpetuated as a result of the frenzy surrounding this new technology.

Remarks by Chairman Jay Clayton

Chair Clayton is consistent with the theme he has been putting forth since taking office: The SEC is committed to helping Main Street investors. The Forum provides a key opportunity for the small-cap marketplace to have their voices heard regarding issues and desired changes to federal securities regulations and the regulatory system.

Chair Clayton reiterates the SEC’s three-part mission to (i) protect investors; (ii) maintain fair, orderly and efficient markets; and (iii) facilitate capital formation. Furthermore, although capital formation is important for all businesses, small and medium-sized businesses contribute the most to U.S. job creation, generating 62% of new jobs. Along the same lines, the SEC wants to open more investment opportunities into small businesses for Main Street investors. In that regard, Jay Clayton points out the Regulation A public offering process. As an aside, I was happy to see him recognize Regulation A as an IPO, whereas when he first took office, he seemed to view Regulation A as outside the IPO realm.

Remarks by Commissioner Michael Piwowar

Michael Piwowar’s statement was short and pointed. As anyone that follows my blog knows, I am a fan of Piwowar, agreeing with most of his views, and more so his willingness to express those views, even when contrary to other SEC chiefs or the legislature. Mr. Piwowar has been vocal about his disagreement with the pay ratio disclosure requirements mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act and uses his statement as an opportunity to reiterate that view, while pointing out that the recent interpretative guidance on the subject will help with the compliance burden.

Commissioner Piwowar ends his statement by promising that he will personally give careful consideration to this year’s recommendations of the Forum. I hope so, as the recommendations are always on point to assist the small-cap marketplace.